Come See the Strollin’ Colon!

Come See the Strollin’ Colon!

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in the U.S., but this cancer is preventable with regular screenings! In honor of colorectal cancer awareness month, you are invited to attend the Colon Cancer Awareness and Remembrance Event. Join us on Saturday, March 23, 11 am-2 pm at the Transylvania County Library to recognize loved ones affected by colon cancer, tour an interactive 12-foot inflatable “Stollin’ Colon” showing healthy and diseased tissue, learn more about colon cancer prevention, and find out how and when you can get screened (including alternatives to colonoscopy). Light refreshments and healthy eating cooking demonstrations will be offered, and medical professionals will be available to answer questions about colon cancer. This event is free and open to everyone. For more information, contact Transylvania Public Health at (828)...
Health Department Notes Importance Of ‘Healthy Smiles’

Health Department Notes Importance Of ‘Healthy Smiles’

To give a child a healthy start in life, it’s important to take care of his or her teeth and gums. Dental health is a big part of total health. The Healthy Smiles Dental Project at Transylvania Public Health is playing an important part in helping establish healthy dental habits at an early age, the release said. “Baby teeth are a very important part of a child’s development,” said Lori Clark, Healthy Smiles Program director. “Baby teeth are as important to children as our teeth are to us. Children need healthy teeth to eat, speak clearly, save space for permanent teeth and have a pretty smile.” Good oral care, a healthy diet and regular dental visits all help to prevent dental disease. Young children learn these healthy habits from their parents and caregivers. Healthy Smiles works with child care centers to provide education, free dental screenings and tooth brushing supplies, with funding support from Delta Dental Foundation. All 11 child care centers in Transylvania County are brushing children’s teeth each day. “I am so excited and proud that the center directors and teachers have made oral health a priority,” said Clark. “Tooth brushing may seem like a small task, but when you have a classroom full of young children, it’s a big deal.” Parents and other caregivers of young children can also take an active role in helping to protect their dental health. Parents should brush their children’s teeth twice a day to remove plaque that can cause tooth decay. They should start brushing a child’s teeth as soon as the first tooth appears, usually around 6 months of age. The American Dental Association...
2018 School Flu Immunization Information

2018 School Flu Immunization Information

Transylvania Public Health is partnering with Transylvania County Schools and Brevard Academy to offer flu vaccinations at your child’s public schools throughout the county. Only injectable flu shots are recommended for use this season, and FluMist will not be offered by Transylvania Public Health for 2018-2019. The flu can be serious, especially in young children, and can cause fever, headache, extreme tiredness and body aches. Flu is very contagious and children can be sick for a week or more, causing them to miss school. The single best way to help prevent the flu is to get a flu vaccination each year. The Centers for Disease Control recommends that all children be vaccinated against the flu. Local medical providers support flu vaccination and are encouraging increased vaccination rates among school-aged children. The goal of this school site immunization initiative is to increase vaccination rates, prevent students from getting and spreading the flu, and ultimately reduce the burden of the flu on the community. Flu vaccines will be offered at school during the school day. Transylvania Public Health nurses will coordinate with school personnel to schedule exact dates and times, but all vaccines will be offered during the month of October. The vaccine will be given by Transylvania Public Health nurses to students with a completed IMMUNIZATION PERMISSION FORM and who qualify to receive flu vaccine. Click here for the IMMUNIZATION PERMISSION FORM and  more information about the flu vaccine. The IMMUNIZATION PERMISSION FORM must be returned to your child’s school by October 1, 2018.  We will be unable to vaccinate anyone without completed paperwork. Your child may be eligible to receive...
Foodborne Outbreak Tests Positive for Norovirus

Foodborne Outbreak Tests Positive for Norovirus

Transylvania Public Health has received confirmatory laboratory tests from the N.C. State Laboratory of Public Health. Of those people who were tested by their medical providers, a majority were positive for norovirus. We believe this outbreak was caused by being exposed to this highly-contagious virus in a public place. Although more information is continuing to come in, Transylvania Public Health has received more than 70 cases of nausea, vomiting and diarrhea reported by medical providers, as well as phone calls reporting similar symptoms in more than 200 people since Tuesday, July 31. Norovirus typically causes diarrhea, vomiting, nausea and stomach pain that lasts for 1 to 3 days. Other symptoms can include fever, headache and body aches. These symptoms and length of illness match closely with the symptoms being reported by those who are ill. People get norovirus from direct contact with an infected person, consuming food or water that has been contaminated with norovirus or touching contaminated surfaces and then putting your unwashed hands in your mouth. It only takes a few virus particles to make someone sick, and those who are ill shed billions of these particles. People are most contagious when they are having symptoms like vomiting and for the first few days after recovering, although they can spread norovirus for two weeks or more after they feel better. Norovirus symptoms usually appear 24-48 hours after being exposed to the virus. Many (but not all) of the people who reported symptoms to us recalled visiting a local restaurant 1-2 days before becoming ill. Other people reported having close contact with someone who had norovirus symptoms prior...
Cleaning Up After Vomiting and Diarrhea

Cleaning Up After Vomiting and Diarrhea

If you or someone in your family has experienced vomiting or diarrhea, here are some cleaning guidelines that can help prevent the spread of disease: 1. Wear gloves when cleaning any vomit or stool. Remove and dispose of gloves carefully to avoid touching outside surfaces. Wash hands with soap and warm water after removing gloves. 2. Clean and disinfect surfaces contaminated with vomit/stool immediately using 1 2/3 cups household bleach per gallon of water or a bleach-based household cleaner. Don’t use undiluted bleach. 3. Immediately remove and wash clothing, towels, or bed linens that may be contaminated with vomit/stool using hot water and detergent. Don’t wash contaminated items with other clothing. If your washer has a sanitizing cycle, use that cycle. 4. Clean and disinfect soiled carpeting. Visible debris should be cleaned using an absorbent material (e.g. double layer paper towels) and discarded in a plastic bag to minimize aerosols. Clean with hot water and detergent and then steam clean (158° F for 5 min or 212° F for 1 min). Dry vacuuming is not...