Fight The Bite

Fight The Bite

Mosquito and tick bites can be more than just annoying. They can make you really sick. It’s important to protect yourself, your family, and your home from the diseases they carry. Click here to learn more about how to protect yourself from mosquitoes and...
6th Graders: Stay on Track

6th Graders: Stay on Track

Due to a North Carolina law, all students are required to receive the Tdap & MCV vaccines before starting 7th grade or 12 years of age.  Both vaccines will be offered to 6th graders school during the week of April 24. Transylvania Public Health school nurses will administer the vaccines to students who have written parental permission; if you wish to have your child vaccinated at school, please complete the permission form and return it to school. Completed permission forms must be returned by March 20. Your student has received a permission packet at school. Forms are also available here. Students who do not receive the vaccines at school will be required to get them at their doctor’s office or Transylvania Public Health prior to entering 7th...
It’s Not Too Late To Get Your Flu Vaccine!

It’s Not Too Late To Get Your Flu Vaccine!

Flu is now widespread throughout North Carolina and Transylvania County is starting to see flu cases, but it’s not too late to get your flu shot. It can take up to two weeks for the antibodies in the flu vaccine to become effective, so it’s best to get vaccinated as soon as possible. But even if you’re not fully protected when you get exposed, the vaccine help make your illness shorter and less severe. As long as the flu virus is active and causing illness, it’s not too late to be vaccinated. The flu season typically peaks between December and March, but can be active as late as May. A late vaccine can protect you against getting sick for the remaining flu season. In fact, even if you have already had the flu this year, the CDC still recommends that you get vaccinated to avoid getting sick again with a different strain of the virus. Flu vaccine is still available at Transylvania Public Health. Immunizations are available on Fridays from 8:30am to 4:30pm and other days by appointment: call 828.884.3135. More information, including payment and insurance is available here. Not to be confused with other illnesses like the norovirus stomach bug, flu is a respiratory virus that causes symptoms that include fever, chills, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle aches, headache, and fatigue. Flu can be a serious illness, especially for adults over age 65, children under 5, pregnant women, and those with a medical condition such as asthma, diabetes, or heart disease. As of January 12, seven people in North Carolina have died from the flu, and other flu-related deaths likely go undiagnosed or unreported. The CDC estimates...

Board of Health Meeting on 1/10 Cancelled

PUBLIC NOTICE: The Transylvania County Board of Health will not meet for its regularly scheduled meeting on Jan. 10, 2016. The Transylvania County Board of Health will meet on its next regularly scheduled meeting date of Feb. 14, 2017 at 6:00 p.m. in the Community Services Building Conference Room on East Morgan Street in downtown Brevard. For additional information, please contact Elaine Russell, secretary to the board, at (828)...
Air Quality Update: Saturday, November 19

Air Quality Update: Saturday, November 19

The air quality forecast for Saturday, November 19 is Code Orange, or “Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups.” Children, older adults, active people, and those with heart disease or respiratory conditions (like asthma) should limit prolonged or heavy exertion outdoors. However, air conditions may vary throughout the day and across the county. Use your own observations to determine how the smoke is affecting air quality in your immediate area. If you can see haze and smell smoke, then air quality is not good and you should limit your outdoor activities. You can also use this guide from the N.C. Division of Air Quality to estimate air pollution based on visibility ranges. Visibility data are available from the National Weather Service at www.weather.gov/gsp.       WHAT CAN I DO TO STAY SAFE? Check local air quality reports. Visit www.ncair.org for daily updates on air quality. Limit physical activity. Increased physical activity requires people to breathe faster, breath deeper, and take in more air—and therefore, more air pollution—into their lungs. You can reduce the amount of time you are breathing hard, take more frequent breaks, and reduce how hard you are working or exercising. Stay inside and keep indoor air as clean as possible. Keep windows and doors closed. Run your HVAC if you have one, but keep the fresh-air intake closed and the filter clean to prevent outdoor smoke from getting inside. Avoid activities that increase indoor pollution. Burning candles, fireplaces, or gas stoves can increase indoor pollution. Vacuuming stirs up particles already inside your home, contributing to indoor pollution. Smoking also puts even more pollution into the air. Follow the advice of your...
Air Quality Update: Friday, November 18

Air Quality Update: Friday, November 18

The air quality forecast for Friday, November 18 is Code Red, or “Unhealthy” conditions. All people should limit prolonged or heavy exertion outdoors. Children, older adults, active people, and those with heart disease or respiratory conditions (like asthma) may experience more serious health effects. Air conditions may vary throughout the day and from one location to another within the county. Therefore, your own observations will be the best guide for determining how the smoke is affecting air quality in your immediate area. If you can see haze and smell smoke, then air quality is not good and you should limit your outdoor activities. WHAT SHOULD I DO? Check local air quality reports. Visit www.ncair.org for daily updates on air quality. You can also use the following guide from the N.C. Division of Air Quality to estimate air pollution based on visibility ranges. Limit physical activity. Increased physical activity requires people to breathe faster, breathe deeper, and take in more air—and therefore, more air pollution—into their lungs. You can reduce the amount of time you are breathing hard, take more frequent breaks, and reduce how hard you are working or exercising. Stay inside and keep indoor air as clean as possible. Keep windows and doors closed. Run your HVAC system if you have one, but keep the fresh-air intake closed and the filter clean to prevent outdoor smoke from getting inside. Avoid activities that increase pollution. Burning candles, fireplaces, or gas stoves can increase indoor pollution. Vacuuming stirs up particles already inside your home, contributing to indoor pollution. Smoking also puts even more pollution into the air. Follow the advice of...